Christopher Cozier

Cozier.JPG
Cozier.JPG

Christopher Cozier

100.00

Residency Period: August - October 2015

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Christopher Cozier (b.1959, Port of Spain, Trinidad & Tobago) is an artist, writer, and curator. He lives and works in Trinidad, and is the recipient of a Prince Claus Award for 2013. He was a Senior Research Fellow at the Academy of The University of Trinidad & Tobago (2006 -10) and co-director of Alice Yard, an arts space in Port-of-Spain. He was a member of the editorial collective of Small Axe: A Caribbean Journal of Criticism (1998-2010) and was an editorial adviser to BOMB Magazine for their Americas issues in 2003, 2004, and 2005. Recent curatorial projects include Paramaribo Span (2010), held in Paramaribo, Suriname. He was Co-Curator of Wrestling With The Image: Caribbean Interventions (2011) at the Art Museum of the Americas in Washington, D.C, and one of the curators of Independent Curators International’s Project 35, Vol. 2 (2012). He was a satellite curatorial advisor to SITE Santa Fe (2014).

As an artist his work has been included in the 5th and 7th Havana Biennial (1994, 2000); Infinite Island (2007),; The Brooklyn Museum (2009); Biennial de Cuenca, Ecuador (2009); Trienal Poli/Gráfica de San Juan: América Latina y el Caribe (2009); Rockstone and Bootheel: Contemporary West Indian Art (2009) at Real Art Ways; Afro Modern: Journeys through the Black Atlantic (2010) at TATE Liverpool; and The Global Africa Project (2010-11) at Museum of Art and Design NY, among others. In 2013, his first one-person exhibition in New York, titled in Development,  opened at David Krut Projects. His most recent video installation, produced during a residency at Northwestern University, was previewed in Gary, Indiana, and at Monique Meloche Gallery in Chicago. Cozier was awarded a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant in 2004 and is the subject of the 2006 documentary Uncomfortable: the Art of Christopher Cozier, produced by Canadian video artist and writer, Richard Fung. The artist will be showing at TEOR/ética, Costa Rica in June 2014.

Photo: Akiko Otta